Testimonial

Amna Noor

Pakistan
Diabetes has taught me patience, given me strength to face difficulties and helped me realise the importance of health in every aspect of life.

How long have you been living with diabetes?

I have been living with type 1 diabetes for 3 years.

How were you diagnosed?

I had a vaginal infection for about one year that was not getting better with medication. During treatment, I had a random blood test which led to me being diagnosed with type 1 diabetes.

Did your diagnosis come as a surprise to you?

It was a very big surprise as I didn’t know what diabetes was. Accepting the diagnosis was the most challenging period of my life. I spent countless days and nights in tears. I then built the courage to fight and not let diabetes get me down.

How did your diagnosis affect your family or loved ones?

My whole family was shocked and really upset after the diagnosis. They still didn't believe it 3-4 months later as there was no history of diabetes in the family. Everyone has now accepted my condition and support me.

What are the most important things that have supported your diabetes care?

My family’s strong support, healthy lifestyle, and, most importantly, the moral support of other people with diabetes that I connected with through "Meethi Zindagi" Pakistan.

What has living with diabetes taught you the most?

Diabetes has taught me patience, given me strength to face difficulties and helped me realise the importance of health in every aspect of life.

What has been your lowest point with diabetes?

The early days with diabetes were my lowest points when it was very difficult to accept the diagnosis. I had a lot of negative thoughts but things got better with time.

Have you ever experienced issues accessing diabetes medicines, supplies and care?

Diabetes supplies are difficult to access due to their cost. This a major issue for the majority of people with diabetes in my country.

What would you like to see change in diabetes over the next 100 years?

I really want to see a cure for type 1 diabetes so that no more lives are lost to the condition or its complications.

What do you think needs to change to improve the lives of people living with diabetes in your country?

I would like to see an end to discrimination of people living with diabetes and easier access to insulin and diabetes technology.

What does the centenary of insulin mean to you?

The centenary of insulin is a blessing for me as insulin is essential to manage my condition. I wish every person living with type 1 diabetes could access this life-saving drug free.

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