Testimonial

Estefania Malassisi

Argentina
 
Although I don't say thank you to life for having the condition, I feel like I wouldn't be where I am today if it wasn't for diabetes.

How long have you been living with diabetes?

I have been living with type 1 diabetes since 1997. I was diagnosed at the age of two.

What are the most important things that have supported your diabetes care?

Education: You need to know a lot to be able to take care of yourself. Whether you have more technology, less technology, use an insulin pen, use insulin pumps or use syringes, wherever you are in the world.

Empowerment: I was never afraid, I was never ashamed. I've always moved forward with diabetes. It's always been a part of me, but nothing more.

Family support: There are times when you feel like you can do anything, and others when you just want to throw everything out the window. This is part of life with diabetes. Our family is there to help us stay calm and avoid throwing everything out the window. They keep it in their hands for a while, so it doesn't fly away and can come back to us again.

What has living with diabetes taught you the most?

Although I don't say thank you to life for having diabetes, I feel like I wouldn't be where I am today if it wasn't for diabetes. It has helped me accomplish a lot.

What has been your lowest point with diabetes?

The toughest time for me was during my adolescence. I was 14 and had been living with diabetes for more than ten years. This is a long time at such a young age. I felt tired and burnt out. I started misbehaving. I would eat secretly and not say anything when my blood glucose was high. I think every young person living with diabetes goes through a similar phase at some point. It's like we say "Enough! I want a day without diabetes!” and do many things that are not right. These moments can have a positive impact, however. Sometimes you need to take one step back in order to move forward stronger.

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