Testimonial

Jamie Saunders

United Kingdom
The centenary of insulin means all that has gone before has meant I have a life-changing condition, not a fundamentally life-threatening one

How long have you been living with diabetes?

4 years.

How were you diagnosed?

Following illness and blood tests, the NHS/doctor notified me of this life-changing shift in my late 40s.

Did your diagnosis come as a surprise to you?

The diagnosis and impacts came as a complete surprise. The NHS diabetes team and DAFNE course really helped me to manage the new regime from the "honeymoon period" to now.

How did your diagnosis affect your family or loved ones?

The diagnosis helped with getting on top of the condition, it's implications and the co-caring needed from families, colleagues and friends.

What are the most important things that have supported your diabetes care?

Really supportive close family. Major support from my employer, a UK local government, and support from management, HR and colleagues. A strong local diabetes support group has also provided peer support to match the NHS/doctor and pharmacy.

What has living with diabetes taught you the most?

That #T1D is ever present and self care with community support is vital.

What has been your lowest point with diabetes?

Unexpected, unexplainable hypos or high blood glucose levels. 24/7 focus requires strong self-determination, reserves of energy and sharing wisely with others like never before.

Have you ever experienced issues accessing diabetes medicines, supplies and care?

I experienced some disruptions during the pandemic but generally the health service, medicines and care have always been there for me. This is a valuable part of a publicly funded health service.

What do you think needs to change to improve the lives of people living with diabetes in your country?

Social, emotional, psychological and effective self care should be fully supported as any medical advances. #nothingaboutuswithoutus #invisibledisability

What does the centenary of insulin mean to you?

As a person living with late onset #T1D, the centenary of insulin means all that has gone before has meant I have a life-changing condition, not a fundamentally life-threatening one. The progress made by the few and the many affects us all so positively.

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