Testimonial

Lucy Amato

Argentina
Diabetes education should reach more people, along with insulin, supplies, technology and the knowledge to make the best use of them

How long have you been living with diabetes?

I have been living with type 1 diabetes for almost 30 years. I was diagnosed in December 1992.

Did your diagnosis come as a surprise to you?

Yes.

How did your diagnosis affect your family or loved ones?

My diagnosis changed everything.

What are the most important things that have supported your diabetes care?

Technology, access to information and educational resources, and the support of family, loved ones and friends.

What has living with diabetes taught you the most?

Resilience.

What has been your lowest point with diabetes?

It took me many years to fully accept my diabetes.

Have you ever experienced issues accessing diabetes medicines, supplies and care?

When I moved to live in another country, it was not easy to get insulin and supplies at the beginning.

What would you like to see change in diabetes over the next 100 years?

I would like educational resources to reach more people, along with insulin, supplies, technology and the knowledge to make the best use of them.

What do you think needs to change to improve the lives of people living with diabetes in your country?

I think we need to better inform society about type 1 diabetes and also empower people living with diabetes so that they can live better and happier with their life-long condition.

What does the centenary of insulin mean to you?

It is a blessing, because I am alive. It also means hope for the future.

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