Testimonial

Maryam Khan

Pakistan
I can do anything and feel very strong. I actually take it as a blessing that I was diagnosed because I like the new me.

How long have you been living with diabetes?

I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes two years ago.

How were you diagnosed?

I was at my brother’s birthday party when I fainted after the cake was cut. My mother checked my blood glucose and it was over 300. She took me to the doctor, where I was diagnosed.

Did your diagnosis come as a surprise to you?

It came as a great shock. I don't like sweets or sugary foods so it was hard for me to accept that I had been diagnosed with diabetes.

How did your diagnosis affect your family or loved ones?

They were surprised, disturbed, and stressed. My mother and younger brothers cried a lot. Things got better with time and we gradually all accepted the condition.

What are the most important things that have supported your diabetes care?

Taking care of my physical and mental health by eating healthy, exercising and keeping my blood glucose in check.

What has living with diabetes taught you the most?

I can do anything and feel very strong. I actually take it as a blessing that I was diagnosed with diabetes because I like the new me.

What has been your lowest point with diabetes?

When people have told me that I shouldn't eat sweets because I have diabetes or that I should avoid certain products that could impact my blood glucose levels, even though they would always have them in front of me.

Have you ever experienced issues accessing diabetes medicines, supplies and care?

Yes. The cost makes it hard to access diabetes medicines and care and is a major issue.

What would you like to see change in diabetes over the next 100 years?

I would like to see a cure for type 1 diabetes.

What do you think needs to change to improve the lives of people living with diabetes in your country?

Insulin should be affordable and mental health services should be more available.

What does the centenary of insulin mean to you?

Insulin is a very important part of the life of every person with type 1 diabetes. It is the only thing that helps us survive. I am very grateful for the discovery and the continued advancements in diabetes care.

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