Testimonial

Olayemi

Nigeria
It's sad and hard living with diabetes but hearing positive stories from people affected from all over the world is encouraging and motivating.

How long have you been living with diabetes?

6 years

How were you diagnosed?

I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in November 2015 after experiencing symptoms like increased thirst, frequent urination and weight loss.

Did your diagnosis come as a surprise to you?

Yes. I never thought I could have diabetes because I don't like sugary foods and was educated that they cause diabetes.

How did your diagnosis affect your family or loved ones?

My mother was devastated.

What are the most important things that have supported your diabetes care?

Insulin, exercise and diet.

What has living with diabetes taught you the most?

I've learnt to accept living with diabetes as my fate. It was not avoidable, so I'm not at fault in any way. I've learnt to accept life this way and move on. I can still enjoy life despite living with diabetes.

Have you ever experienced issues accessing diabetes medicines, supplies and care?

Many times. The cost and availability of insulin have been issues.

What would you like to see change in diabetes over the next 100 years?

More affordable insulin and more awareness, since the symptoms of diabetes can be very tricky to spot. The more people are educated about it, the better. If this is achieved, I think diabetes will no longer be feared and people affected will be able to speak out, greatly reducing the fear of stigma.

What do you think needs to change to improve the lives of people living with diabetes in your country?

Better healthcare, affordable and cheaper insulin and more awareness.

What does the centenary of insulin mean to you?

It's sad and hard living with diabetes but hearing positive stories from people affected from all over the world is encouraging and motivating.

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