Testimonial

Renza Scibilia

Australia
I am fortunate in Australia that access to medication and (most) diabetes supplies is subsidised by the government. I realise just how privileged I am.

How long have you been living with diabetes?

23 years

How were you diagnosed?

I had the classic symptoms - unquenchable thirst, needing to go to the toilet constantly, weight loss, exhaustion, blurred vision. I went to the GP and had a blood test and was diagnosed a couple of days later.

Did your diagnosis come as a surprise to you?

Yes! There is no diabetes in my family. I now know that in most cases of type 1 diabetes, there is no family history.

How did your diagnosis affect your family or loved ones?

We all learnt to live with it. I was getting married six months after diagnosis, so my husband learnt all about diabetes alongside me.

What are the most important things that have supported your diabetes care?

A combination of access to technology and healthcare, a supportive family and peer support from others living with diabetes.

What has been your lowest point with diabetes?

The most difficult thing I’ve been through, and when I have been at my lowest, was dealing with fertility issues. Managing diabetes while trying to get pregnant and then when miscarrying was very tough.

Have you ever experienced issues accessing diabetes medicines, supplies and care?

I am fortunate in Australia that access to medication and (most) diabetes supplies is subsidised by the government. I realise just how privileged I am.

What would you like to see change in diabetes over the next 100 years?

A cure of course!! But in lieu of that - access to affordable healthcare, medication and the latest technology to all. And mental health support as part of routine diabetes care.

What do you think needs to change to improve the lives of people living with diabetes in your country?

Better access to a broader variety of diabetes technology. More mental health support for people with diabetes.

What does the centenary of insulin mean to you?

It’s a time to recognise just how important research is. And to celebrate this incredible medical discovery while continuing to push for better access for everyone.

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