Testimonial

Sadia Arshad

Pakistan
Acceptance and support from my family and friends, access to insulin and peer support have played a major part in my diabetes journey

How long have you been living with diabetes?

I have been living with type 1 diabetes for 13 years.

How were you diagnosed?

I was losing weight drastically so my parents took me to the hospital. After a few blood tests recommended by my physician I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes.

Did your diagnosis come as a surprise to you?

Yes. There was no history of type 1 diabetes in my family.

How did your diagnosis affect your family or loved ones?

It was a shock to everyone around me, but they kept composed and supported, educated and loved me more than ever. They also gave me extra time to manage my condition.

What are the most important things that have supported your diabetes care?

Acceptance and support from my family and friends, access to insulin and peer support have played a major part in my diabetes journey.

What has living with diabetes taught you the most?

To be more kind and patient towards other people. You can never know the invisible battle that someone may be fighting.

What has been your lowest point with diabetes?

When society discriminates people, particularly women, living with diabetes.

Have you ever experienced issues accessing diabetes medicines, supplies and care?

I have never experienced issues regarding access to basic diabetes supplies. However, the price of insulin is increasing, technology is advancing and new diabetes gadgets are being introduced that are quite expensive. So, my diabetes care takes a major part of my finances.

What would you like to see change in diabetes over the next 100 years?

Easily accessible and affordable insulin, diabetes supplies and medicines across the world.

What do you think needs to change to improve the lives of people living with diabetes in your country?

Affordable insulin should be accessible to every person with diabetes who needs it.

What does the centenary of insulin mean to you?

It means a lot to me. The discovery of insulin and the continued advancements in its effectiveness allow me to live a flexible life and fulfil all my dreams.

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