Testimonial

Samar Zia

Pakistan
Diabetes has taught me that every difficulty either makes us or breaks us and that it depends on us whether we become the victim or the victor.

How long have you been living with diabetes?

I have been living with diabetes for 19 years. I was diagnosed when I was 11.

How were you diagnosed?

I had abdominal pain and lost 8 kg in one month. I felt weak all the time.

Did your diagnosis come as a surprise to you?

I could not understand the condition and its severity. I felt a big change in my life which was difficult to accept, but I learnt to live with it.

How did your diagnosis affect your family or loved ones?

My whole family was surprised, especially my sisters. They were sad, scared and worried because no one in my family knew about type 1 diabetes.

What are the most important things that have supported your diabetes care?

Insulin and blood glucose meters, wonderful discoveries that have been so helpful in managing my condition.
My sisters that are so caring towards me.
My doctor, who has provided moral support and care since my diagnosis and encouraged me that I can live a normal life.

What has living with diabetes taught you the most?

Diabetes has given me strength and patience. It has taught me that every difficulty either makes us or breaks us and that it depends on us whether we become the victim or the victor.

What has been your lowest point with diabetes?

Fear of hypoglycemia has been the biggest barrier to my diabetes control. I also have OCD issues and it has been difficult to cope with both situations at the same time.

Have you ever experienced issues accessing diabetes medicines, supplies and care?

Unfortunately yes, because I belong to a society where expenses on medical supplies are considered useless.

What would you like to see change in diabetes over the next 100 years?

A cure for type 1 diabetes that is accessible to everyone.

What do you think needs to change to improve the lives of people living with diabetes in your country?

There should be greater awareness of diabetes to tackle stigma and false beliefs related to the condition. Diabetes educators should be available for this purpose and also to empower people living with diabetes. Medical supplies should also be available to everyone that needs them.

What does the centenary of insulin mean to you?

Insulin is a wonderful discovery that not only saves lives but also prevents or delays complications.

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